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Protection of wildlife - Endangered mammels

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Preview: River dolphin (Inia geoffrensis)
River dolphin (Inia geoffrensis)

River dolphin (Inia geoffrensis)

Preview: superb jaguar on a road ne Concepción
superb jaguar on a road ne Concepción

superb jaguar on a road ne Concepción

Preview: friendly River Dolphin (inia geoffrensis boliviansis)
friendly River Dolphin (inia geoffrensis boliviansis)

friendly River Dolphin (inia geoffrensis boliviansis)

Preview: Capybara (hydrochoerus hydrochaeris)
Capybara (hydrochoerus hydrochaeris)

Capybara (hydrochoerus hydrochaeris)

Preview: Giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis)
Giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis)

Giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis)

Preview: Two giant-otters (pteronura brasiliensis) on the shore of Rio Paraguá
Two giant-otters (pteronura brasiliensis) on the shore of Rio Paraguá

Two giant-otters (pteronura brasiliensis) on the shore of Rio Paraguá

Preview: Few know that jaguars are excellent swimmers - This one is crossing the wide and dangerous Rio Iténez not far from Piso Firme
Few know that jaguars are excellent swimmers - This one is crossing the wide and dangerous Rio Iténez not far from Piso Firme

Few know that jaguars are excellent swimmers - This one is crossing the wide and dangerous Rio Iténez not far from Piso Firme

In Bolivia, SIMBIOSIS - Mensch u. Natur e. V. stands up for mammals that are in danger of  extermination. Because these animals are outstandingly beautiful and eye-catching, they are hunted and are in great danger of disappearing. All species, including birds, reptiles, and so on, are threatened by indiscriminate hunting, so mammals are only a small selection. Unfortunately, too often people shoot at anything that is alive. Therefore, wildlife in the vicinity of human settlements can rarely be seen.

We've limited the animals we discuss here to  well-known mammals. There are many more that are not listed here, in particular species of smaller primates, whose populations show dramatic declines. There are also some mammals that are hunted for their meat, but are able to adapt to habitat changes or have a high reproduction rate and therefore are still rather common. Rare, highly specialized animals or those that attract attention because of their beauty and elegance are thoughtlessly destroyed, and the extinction of species is progressing quickly. Only a short time is left to intervene and protect them.  Almost all action comes from individuals and private initiatives.  We have not observed the presence of any internationally well-known organizations "in the field" of the Bolivian lowlands.

Jaguar (Panthera onca)

Jaguars are acutely endangered.  They are or missing in many areas of their previous habitation due to excessive hunting. They are becoming more scarce because of habitat loss as a result of clear-cutting and possibly because of a lack of prey.

Puma (Puma concolor)

Pumas occur everywhere but are often rare. They are pursued by cattle ranchers and are in danger because of extensive hunting of their prey.

Ocelot (Leopardis pardalis)

Some years ago, ocelots were pursued intensively because of their fur. At present, they are hunted much less often, because of the trade ban. They have become very rare in many areas. Still nowadays young men in the countryside can be seen bragging by having covered their motorcycle seat with an ocelot coat.

Tigrillo or Margay (Leopardis wiedii, Bolivia: gato montés)

Smaller than an ocelot and seldom hunted, these animals are in danger nevertheless because of clear-cutting of their habitat and because they get caught in traps set for up for ocelots.

Yaguarundi (Herpailurus yaguarundi, Bolivia: gato gris)

This animal is not being particularly hunted, but has nevertheless become quite rare.

Tapir (tapirus terrestris Bolivia: Anta)

Tapirs are still frequent in some areas, but are very rare or eradicated in others where they are hunted because of their meat. They are easy for hunters to track down because they respond to the imitation of their sounds and are vulnerable to dogs.

Anteater and Giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactiyla Bolivien: Oso hormiguero gigante, Oso hormiguero bandera)

In some previous distribution zones, they have already become extinct. Anteaters are widespread in some places, but are hunted or caught without any comprehensible reason.

Giant otter (pteronura brasiliensis, Bolivia: Lobo de rio gigante, londra)

Endangered. Although otters are frequent in undisturbed waters, such areas are increasingly difficult to find. They are being killed for their fur and for being falsely believed to be a food-competitor because of their capacity to catch almost all fish. Because their habitat at riverbanks and in lakes is more limited than that of spotted cats, they are in even more danger than those animals.

River otter (Lontra longicaudis, Bolivia: Lobito de rio)

The river otter fares similarly. In contrast to the giant otter, however, it prefers quickly flowing streams and clear waters. Seen rarely. The present degree of hunting pressure and distribution of current populations are to a large extent unknown.

Bushdog (Speothos venaticus, Bolivia: Perrito de monte)

The bushdogs are at risk because of interferences in their habitat and habitat annihilation. The species has always been extremely rare and only little evidence and few observations exist.

Red howler monkey (Alouatta seniculus, Bolivia: Manechi colorado) and Black howler monkey (Alouatta caraya, Bolivien (Manechi negro)

Both species have a large distribution zone, but are endangered by habitat fragmentation and hunting.

Spider-monkey, white-bellied (ateles belzebuth, Bolivia: Mono araña, marimono)

These spider monkeys are being pursued because of their size and visibility, and they are critically endangered like other types of spider monkeys in South and Central America.

Bibliographie: Mamíferos de los bosques Húmedos de América Tropical, F.A.N., Santa Cruz de la Sierra, 1999.



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